Dating News :: Aug 20th, 2019 : new laws, Herrick vs Grindr, Tinder/Bumble on-campus

Dating News :: Aug 20th, 2019 : new laws, Herrick vs Grindr, Tinder/Bumble on-campus

TRANSCRIPT

I’m Mark Brooks and this is the 2 minute Tuesday top news summary.

Sending unwanted sexually explicit photos will become a crime in Texas beginning September 1st. Anyone found guilty of sending unsolicited sexual images could get a fine of $500. The UK government is also looking to criminalize this act but this might be a long journey. By law, it’s considered “indecent exposure” to flash your naked body on the street so some argue, why should it be excused in online dating? Currently, the only country to have criminalised cyber-flashing is Singapore where the behaviour is punishable by 2 years in prison, no less….

Meanwhile, Match Group is advocating for a new law in Utah about catfishing. The law will require that dating apps that ban a user for catfishing should then notify anyone that the catfisher interacted with through the app that the person was rogue. That’s because if someone is running a scam on one person, chances are they’re running it on many others, too, or have taken users off the app and are continuing their rogue activity. You may ask why such notifications need to be required by law? Why isn’t this a common practice for us anyway? I know some dating apps do this as a matter of course. But shouldn’t we all. It can be alarming for users, of course, to get these kinds of messages. “Hey, that potential date we hooked you up with, they’re rogue, you should now dump them.” It’s always been a not-easy thing for dating apps to communicate, but it’s better we help users avoid a potentially terrible and life threatening rendezvous.

We’re heavy on law this week. You may recall the civil lawsuit, Herrick vs Grindr from 2016. It challenged Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act which is key to providing tech platform like dating apps with immunity from the actions of users. Matthew Herrick sued Grindr, claiming the gay dating app did nothing to stop his ex-boyfriend from harrasing and impersonating him on the app. His ex sent over a 1000 strangers to his home to have sex with him. Unfortunately for Mr Herrick, the lawsuit was dismissed last year. He is now asking the Supreme Court to revive his case insisting that Grindr should not be protected under the Communications Decency Act.

Tinder was seeded and born on college campuses, and is at it again. Actually both Tinder and Bumble have stepped up their game on college campuses across the US. Here’s how it works. In short, Tinder or Bumble profiles are required for entry at some fraternity parties. Genius, eh? Fraternities are deciding whether they’re a Bumble house or a Tinder house, and signing contracts with the dating apps that provide money to cover production costs for the parties. In exchange, the frats provide access to thousands of potential new users. Tinder and Bumble declined to specify their campus involvement, though both said their apps have college marketing events across the country.

That’s all for now. Thanks for watching.

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